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Take care of your pet games online: 10 of the best work from home jobs hiring right now

  n Followu00a0 Ladders on Flipboard ! n Follow Laddersu2019 magazines on Flipboard coveringu00a0 Happiness ,u00a0 Productivity ,u00a0 Job Satisfaction ,u00a0 Neuroscience , andu00a0 more ! n n Recent research from LinkedIn u00a0found thatu00a0among the main sources of emotional unrest during a u201cquarter-life crisis,u201d the most common one is finding a position or career that they love; the second most common was seeing how they measure up tou00a0peers who are doing better. n Censuswide surveyed more than 6,000 people ages 25-33 in the US, India, the UK, and Australia for LinkedIn. n Here are some of the findings and how to cope with a quarter-life crisis of your own. n This is what really stresses out young adults n As it turns out, weathering a quarter-life crisis is definitely common u2014 the professional networking platform found that a staggering 75% of people 25-33 have gone through one, which is usually linked u201cto feeling like they are at a crossroad in their career.” n LinkedIn found that 59% of people 25-33 havenu2019t been clear about what they want u201cto do next in career or life,u201d 54% are troubled by u201ccareer options,u201d and 49% think they donu2019t rake in enough money. n   n Here’s how to manage a quarter-life crisis n Use these tips to navigate your flood of emotions. n Drop the word ‘should’ when it comes to yourself n Remember that everything is relative. n Kali Rogers, CEO and Founder of Blush Online Life Coaching , explores why you should u201cquit u2018should-ingu2019 yourselfu201d during a quarter-life crisis in HuffPost . n “Stop beating yourself up for these phantom accomplishments you were ‘supposed’ to achieve. Let yourself just be! You want to know how I already know youu2019re awesome? (Other than the fact that youu2019re reading this.) Because youu2019re worried about your future. You care. Youu2019re spiraling into a hazy fog because you are so freaked out over the fact that you might not have an awesome life. And THAT above anything else is a great indicator for the opposite,” Rogers writes. n Make a habit of talking it out n Don’t go through it alone u2014 get some perspective. n Varci Vartanian features advice from Nathan Gehlert, Ph.D., a Washington D.C. psychologist who leads a support group called QuarterLife+10, in The Muse . n u201cGehlert asserts that women are at a significant advantage in any kind of crisis, as they tend to seek support more frequently than men do. u2018The best and first thing you should do if youu2019re feeling stuck and unhappy is to start talking to your friends,u2019 he says. u2018I struggled similarly in my 20s u2014 it helped me remember that my perception of u2018falling behindu2019 wasnu2019t really accurate.u2019 He also recommends an outside-of-work mentor, as your boss may not always have your best interest in mind. u2018Itu2019s really important to have someone who you can be completely honest with,u2019 he explains,u201d Vartanian writes. n Go and do something about it n CreateU founder Jules Schroeder spoke with Robert MacNaughton, the cofounder and CEO of the Integral Center in Boulder, CO, during theu00a0 Unconventional Life podcast and featured his advice in Forbes . n MacNaughton grew up questioning larger societal concepts and has deemed this u2018Postmodern Integral Theory,u2019 which, Schroeder writes , u201creflect a healthy skepticism towards traditional world views in order to transcend limited thinking and achieve greater mindfulness.u201d n u201cThe war of our identity and figuring out who we are and what we care about is our opportunity. This is the reason to get out of bed in the morning. Start a business, post something on Facebook and see what happens,u201d MacNaughton told Schroeder. n”,”protected”:false},”excerpt”:{“rendered”:” The quarter-life crisis is real. Here’s what to do if you find yourself in one, and steps to take to avoid it altogether. n”,”protected”:false},”author”:251,”featured_media”:30213,”comment_status”:”closed”,”ping_status”:”closed”,”sticky”:false,”template”:””,”format”:”standard”,”meta”:{“amp_status”:””},”categories”:[94,28463,95,97],”tags”:[1266,11657,86,2588,17347,29025,326,9592,9493,88,81],”yst_prominent_words”:[23053,6612,136,1859,3315,17503,70103,17407,18039,17450,194,17521,23059,204,23056,23014,23012,23058,17413,23013],”yoast”:{“focuskw”:”quarter-life crisis”,”title”:””,”metadesc”:”The quarter-life crisis is real. Here’s what to do if you find yourself in one, and steps to take to avoid it altogether.”,”linkdex”:”79″,”metakeywords”:””,”meta-robots-noindex”:””,”meta-robots-nofollow”:””,”meta-robots-adv”:””,”canonical”:””,”redirect”:””,”opengraph-title”:”Here’s how to keep your quarter-life crisis from breaking you down”,”opengraph-description”:”The struggle is real.”,”opengraph-image”:”/wp-content/uploads/Quarter_LIfe_Crisis.jpg”,”twitter-title”:””,”twitter-description”:””,”twitter-image”:””},”acf”:{“not_original_content”:false,”pinterest_image”:false,”related_tag”:{“term_id”:1266,”name”:”Advice”,”slug”:”advice”,”term_group”:0,”term_taxonomy_id”:1266,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”description”:””,”parent”:0,”count”:1378,”filter”:”raw”}},”yoast_meta”:{“title”:”Here’s how to keep your quarter-life crisis from breaking you down | Ladders”},”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78258″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts”}],”about”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/types/post”}],”author”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/users/251″}],”replies”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/comments?post=78258″}],”version-history”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78258/revisions”}],”wp:featuredmedia”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media/30213″}],”wp:attachment”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media?parent=78258″}],”wp:term”:[{“taxonomy”:”category”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/categories?post=78258″},{“taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/tags?post=78258″},{“taxonomy”:”yst_prominent_words”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/yst_prominent_words?post=78258″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:78094,”date”:”2019-05-26T04:22:33″,”date_gmt”:”2019-05-26T08:22:33″,”guid”:{“rendered”:”/?p=78094″},”modified”:”2019-05-23T11:28:08″,”modified_gmt”:”2019-05-23T15:28:08″,”slug”:”5-ways-to-maintain-your-mental-health-while-working-in-a-high-stress-job”,”status”:”publish”,”type”:”post”,”link”:”/career-advice/5-ways-to-maintain-your-mental-health-while-working-in-a-high-stress-job/”,”title”:{“rendered”:”5 ways to maintain your mental health while working in a high-stress job”},”content”:{“rendered”:” Weu2019ve all been there. Itu2019s 8 p.m. You receive a Slack message from your manager reminding you that your deadline is at midnight, or that a key client is unhappy, or that youu2019ll have to come into the office this weekend to finish a reportu2013u2013despite whatever plans you might have already made. n When these things happen, those of us on the other side of the computer screen suffer. We suffer because we become overwhelmed, anxious, and, above all,u00a0 stressed . And stress ultimately damages our mental health and our overall quality of life. n n Follow Ladders on Flipboard ! n Follow Laddersu2019 magazines on Flipboard covering Happiness , Productivity , Job Satisfaction , Neuroscience , and more ! n n Now, while a majority of Americans reportu00a0 feeling stress at work , there are some companies who proactively try and help their employees protect their mental health. n For example, early in my career, I worked at Federal Express, a place where leadership offered employees u201cmental health daysu201d to ensure we were all taking care of ourselves. They did this because they understood the nature of our work to be inherently stressfulu2013u2013whether it was meeting a deadline or dealing with irate customers, everyone at the company was from time to time overworked. Because of that, they wanted to help us combat negative feelings. n This was, of course, great, but the truth is, not all companies are so empathetic or caring. And understanding as we do that stress isu00a0 physiologically damaging , itu2019s incumbent upon us to take steps to protect and nurture our own mental health. n We shouldnu2019t feel ashamed of investing in as much, either. Rather, itu2019s smart to actively invest in your u00a0mental health. Itu2019s a matter of being fully present in both your professionalu00a0andu00a0your personal life, and of taking action to be the best version of yourself possible. n Here are a few strategies Iu2019ve learned to be helpful to this end over the course of my career. n 1) Always take your breaks and lunches n Americans, especially, glamorize over-working. We think that to work relentlesslyu2013u2013and to forgo your breaks during the dayu2013u2013is evidence of your passion, commitment, and investment. As such, many of us do things like eat lunch at our desks or stay in our windowless office for 9 hours straight. n This is, in a word, shortsighted. n Simply put, people are more effective when they take regular breaksu2013u2013and that includes eating lunch away from your laptop. Atu00a0 World Changers , I encourage my employees to take 15-minute breaks in the morning and afternoon, in addition to going on walks and clearing their head as needed. This, I believe, allows our minds to reset and declutter so that when we come back to our work, our responsibilities feel more manageable. n 2) Exercise regularly n Our physical health directly impacts our mental health. n If we neglect our bodiesu2013u2013if we donu2019t go outside during the day, or exercise often, or go for walksu2013u2013we put ourselves in a deeper hole. n Itu2019s not always easy, but you need to prioritize doing things like going to the gym or otherwise being active for some parts of the day. Whether your company assists you with this or not, think of it as another means of investing in your mental acuity. n 3) Actually take mental health days if you need them n The mental health days I took from time to time at Federal Express were essential. They gave me set blocks of time with which I could reset. They helped me maintain, too, a sort of balanced perspective in which I saw my work as merely a facet of my lifeu2013u2013not myu00a0entireu00a0life. n Like taking 30 minutes to exercise or eating lunch away from your laptop, allowing yourself to take mental health days amounts to investing in your improved ability to focus and be productive while youu2019re at work. Humans are not machines. Just as we canu2019t operate at 100% capacity without breaks all day, we canu2019t operate at optimal efficiency allu00a0yearu00a0without ever taking a meaningful amount of timeu2013u2013be it a day or a weeku2013u2013away from the office. n 4) Unplug from work when you get home n Similarly, to truly protect your mental health, you must set aside timeu2013u2013in addition to lunches and daily breaksu2013u2013thatu2019s solely for you and your family. If you find yourselfu00a0alwaysu00a0checking your email at home, oru00a0alwaysu00a0monitoring Slack, youu2019re never giving yourself essential time to appreciate your loved ones or the things that make you happyu2013u2013which is something all humans need. n As someone whou2019s run several organizations, this is a point Iu2019ve learned a lot about over the years. Itu2019s tempting to forfeit your entire life to the people youu2019re in charge of and the initiatives you want badly to succeed. But giving yourself so holistically to your work breeds resentment and, in time, erodes happiness. Iu2019ve benefited immensely from ensuring that my time at home, when Iu2019m not at the office, is spent solely with my family, members of my church, or reading a great book. n We can only be effective as professionals if we remain cognizant of who we areu2013u2013and what we love doingu2013u2013as people. Being a person comes first. n 5) Delegate your responsibilities at work n Finally, remember not to push yourself past your breaking point. n This was another big lesson for me. Early in my career, I thought that to give up the chance tou00a0take on moreu00a0was akin to forfeiting my chance at a future promotion or raise. But the truth is, if you accept more responsibility than you can reasonably handle, youu2019ll end up doing more damage than good. n So, when you reach your breaking point, donu2019t try and barrel past it. Define what your boundaries are, speak up when youu2019ve reached them, and delegate some of your responsibilities to your people. n If this sounds hard, youu2019re not alone. I know many ambitious, inspired people suffer from the same false belief I sometimes suffer from, which is this idea that we have to dou00a0everythingu00a0ourselves. Itu2019s a belief compounded by the anxiety that if weu2019re not pushing ourselves past our limits of capacity, weu2019re not doing enough to get ahead or succeed. n But your ambition cannot supersede the importance of maintaining your mental health. Because itu2019s true: at a certain point, overworking really does become unproductive. n At the end of the day, in order to be most effective, you have to be happy, healthy, and mentally balanced. n In some ways, then, protecting your mental health is your first and most important responsibility as an enterprising professional. Itu2019s an ongoing project you canu2019t afford to neglectu2013u2013even when you get that late night Slack message. n This article first appeared on Minutes .u00a0 n n You might also enjoy… n n New neuroscience reveals 4 rituals that will make you happy n Strangers know your social class in the first seven words you say, study finds n 10 lessons from Benjamin Franklinu2019s daily schedule that will double your productivity n The worst mistakes you can make in an interview, according to 12 CEOs n 10 habits of mentally strong people n n”,”protected”:false},”excerpt”:{“rendered”:” Understanding as we do that stress isu00a0physiologically damaging, itu2019s incumbent upon us to take steps to protect and nurture our own mental health. n”,”protected”:false},”author”:1156,”featured_media”:72841,”comment_status”:”closed”,”ping_status”:”closed”,”sticky”:false,”template”:””,”format”:”standard”,”meta”:{“amp_status”:””},”categories”:[94,21957,26703,97,96,28464],”tags”:[17380,1266,17402,20259,11657,73,7176,29025,326,9493],”yst_prominent_words”:[6087,17506,37085,87599,8857,87598,70103,17560,17450,87597,355,347,255,204,87600,8899,246,17443,17044,17378],”yoast”:{“focuskw”:”stress”,”title”:””,”metadesc”:”Understanding as we do that stress isu00a0physiologically damaging, itu2019s incumbent upon us to take steps to protect and nurture our own mental health.”,”linkdex”:”68″,”metakeywords”:””,”meta-robots-noindex”:””,”meta-robots-nofollow”:””,”meta-robots-adv”:””,”canonical”:””,”redirect”:””,”opengraph-title”:””,”opengraph-description”:””,”opengraph-image”:”/wp-content/uploads/stress_job_190411.jpg”,”twitter-title”:””,”twitter-description”:””,”twitter-image”:””},”acf”:{“not_original_content”:false,”related_tag”:{“term_id”:15765,”name”:”Stress”,”slug”:”stress”,”term_group”:0,”term_taxonomy_id”:15765,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”description”:””,”parent”:0,”count”:297,”filter”:”raw”}},”yoast_meta”:{“title”:”5 ways to maintain your mental health while working in a high-stress job | Ladders”},”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78094″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts”}],”about”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/types/post”}],”author”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/users/1156″}],”replies”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/comments?post=78094″}],”version-history”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78094/revisions”}],”wp:featuredmedia”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media/72841″}],”wp:attachment”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media?parent=78094″}],”wp:term”:[{“taxonomy”:”category”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/categories?post=78094″},{“taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/tags?post=78094″},{“taxonomy”:”yst_prominent_words”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/yst_prominent_words?post=78094″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:78064,”date”:”2019-05-26T04:11:35″,”date_gmt”:”2019-05-26T08:11:35″,”guid”:{“rendered”:”/?p=78064″},”modified”:”2019-05-23T11:30:46″,”modified_gmt”:”2019-05-23T15:30:46″,”slug”:”how-to-make-progress-everyday-and-leave-the-worry-behind”,”status”:”publish”,”type”:”post”,”link”:”/career-advice/how-to-make-progress-everyday-and-leave-the-worry-behind/”,”title”:{“rendered”:”How to make progress everyday and leave the worry behind”},”content”:{“rendered”:” What does everyday progress even mean? n Every day progress is really about living your best life. Fluffy, right? Well, yeah. But thatu2019s the 30,000-foot view. I think about this because recently, someone asked me how did I know I was ready to do the work that I love to do. I said, n u201cBecause Iu2019m proud of the life I live each day and I stick to my values and principles and try to do myu00a0best.u201d n You have to keep it simple. Thatu2019s how you make progress. Thatu2019s the magic for how you keep going with consistency each day. While I do believe in taking a day off here and there, there also shouldnu2019t be any u201coff daysu201d in terms of making progress. n n Follow Ladders on Flipboard ! n Follow Laddersu2019 magazines on Flipboard covering Happiness , Productivity , Job Satisfaction , Neuroscience , and more ! n n Think of this in the context of always wanting to stick to your values, how you define success and how you want to make your mark on the world. n Seeing successful, happy and fulfilled people reminds me that thereu2019s so much consistency to what they do. Thereu2019s progress each day. In how they love and treat their husband or wife. n How they love their children. Whether theyu2019re legitimately becoming more mentally, spiritually, emotionally and physically stronger and prepared to meet every new task and challenge in front of them. n Thatu2019s beautiful stuff. It takes foresight, self-awareness and a mindset of a winner. n And letu2019s be honest- it takes sacrifice. Often times, when we keep focusing on the things that it takes to be the best in what we do, we recognize that we sacrifice in other areas. And the truth is, while we know in our heart that giving up these u201clesser optionsu201d is the right thing to do, that doesnu2019t make it easy. n There are temptations to give in. To compromise our values or simply our daily routine or list of things to do. Please know, sometimes repeating mistakes of the past happens. n Doing the wrong thing, while knowing youu2019re doing the wrong thing isnu2019t good. But it shouldnu2019t mean that you blame yourself and put yourself in some personal prison. All the self-condemnation in the world will do you no good. n Weu2019re human. As a friend once told me, u201cGive yourself some grace.u201d n Weu2019re going to screw up and part of progress- yes, for real- is actually growing and picking yourself up from the space of adversity and stumbles. n So much of everyday consistency and progress for me is tied to having a plan. Having big goals, wanting big results and following the process to get there. This u201cprocessu201d is what I help coaching clients with every day. This is where the real battle for progress is won. n I also encourage everyone to follow your intuition. Follow your heart. It has this unbelievable knack of letting you know what it really means to do whatu2019s right FOR YOU. Listen to that voice inside of you and trust yourself. n When youu2019re living a good life, your intuition and your heart will tell you. Itu2019s what Iu2019ve used as my guide. I can literally feel emotionally and physically when Iu2019m about to do something wrong. I know it. Maybe you know the same feeling. n Make progress every day by following a simple path. Donu2019t put too many things on your plateu200au2014u200ayes that includes both tasks and worries! Keep things as simple as possible. Use positive affirmations and visualization to see yourself achieving and accomplishing what you want to do. n The Wins will pile up for you and youu2019ll feel the grace of knowing youu2019re doing the right thing. n Join my newsletter for the bestu00a0 emotional intelligence and productivity content on the Internet!u00a0 Get a FREE Coaching Call to Explore Your Emotional Intelligence, and Learn how to Achieve Your Biggest Goals! Check out my Amazon bestseller, The Value of You, which has helped tens of thousands of people develop the game plan for living their best life! n   n n You might also enjoy… n n New neuroscience reveals 4 rituals that will make you happy n Strangers know your social class in the first seven words you say, study finds n 10 lessons from Benjamin Franklinu2019s daily schedule that will double your productivity n The worst mistakes you can make in an interview, according to 12 CEOs n 10 habits of mentally strong people n n”,”protected”:false},”excerpt”:{“rendered”:” Seeing successful, happy and fulfilled people reminds me that thereu2019s so much consistency to what they do. Thereu2019s progress each day. n”,”protected”:false},”author”:610,”featured_media”:72918,”comment_status”:”closed”,”ping_status”:”closed”,”sticky”:false,”template”:””,”format”:”standard”,”meta”:{“amp_status”:””},”categories”:[94,26703,19865,97,96,28464],”tags”:[17380,1266,11657,73,7176,29025,326,9493],”yst_prominent_words”:[17752,87579,47271,87570,7937,87569,6202,340,70103,20046,17570,17450,1175,17724,204,1021,7422,17359,7520,17470],”yoast”:{“focuskw”:”progress”,”title”:””,”metadesc”:”Seeing successful, happy and fulfilled people reminds me that thereu2019s so much consistency to what they do. Thereu2019s progress each day.”,”linkdex”:”83″,”metakeywords”:””,”meta-robots-noindex”:””,”meta-robots-nofollow”:””,”meta-robots-adv”:””,”canonical”:””,”redirect”:””,”opengraph-title”:””,”opengraph-description”:””,”opengraph-image”:”/wp-content/uploads/happy_woman_190411.jpg”,”twitter-title”:””,”twitter-description”:””,”twitter-image”:””},”acf”:{“not_original_content”:false,”related_tag”:{“term_id”:1266,”name”:”Advice”,”slug”:”advice”,”term_group”:0,”term_taxonomy_id”:1266,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”description”:””,”parent”:0,”count”:1378,”filter”:”raw”}},”yoast_meta”:{“title”:”How to make progress everyday and leave the worry behind | Ladders”},”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78064″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts”}],”about”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/types/post”}],”author”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/users/610″}],”replies”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/comments?post=78064″}],”version-history”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78064/revisions”}],”wp:featuredmedia”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media/72918″}],”wp:attachment”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media?parent=78064″}],”wp:term”:[{“taxonomy”:”category”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/categories?post=78064″},{“taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/tags?post=78064″},{“taxonomy”:”yst_prominent_words”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/yst_prominent_words?post=78064″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:78231,”date”:”2019-05-26T04:10:39″,”date_gmt”:”2019-05-26T08:10:39″,”guid”:{“rendered”:”/?p=78231″},”modified”:”2019-05-22T14:52:31″,”modified_gmt”:”2019-05-22T18:52:31″,”slug”:”why-successful-people-are-unhappy-in-middle-age-and-what-to-do-about-it”,”status”:”publish”,”type”:”post”,”link”:”/career-advice/why-successful-people-are-unhappy-in-middle-age-and-what-to-do-about-it/”,”title”:{“rendered”:”This is why successful people are unhappy in middle age u2013u00a0and what to do about it”},”content”:{“rendered”:” Writing a book about age and happiness brought many surprises, but none surpasses this: High-achieving professionals seem especially vulnerable to dissatisfaction in midlife. n Typical is Simon, one of many I interviewed. In his mid-40s, he has achieved success and prominence in his chosen field, to the point of becoming a media figure in a major city. “I’ve done everything I want to do, for the most part,” he told me. So does he feel content? “No. Exhausted. I feel at times like an amazing f–k-up who has gotten away with stuff. I’ve thought of running away to Brazil. Changing my name and becoming a hotel clerk.” n Objectively, his dissatisfaction seems to make no sense, especially to him. “Maybe there’s something deeply psychologically wrong with me,” he mused. n I had many versions of that conversation with successful professionals. It was as if doing well in life puts high achievers at additional risk of discontent. Which, it turns out, is exactly the case. n n Follow Ladders on Flipboard ! n Follow Laddersu2019 magazines on Flipboard covering Happiness , Productivity , Job Satisfaction , Neuroscience , and more ! n n The (surprising) effect of time on happiness n To understand why midlife can be such a hazardous and perplexing time for high achievers, begin with a recent scientific discovery: For happiness, time matters u2014 but not in the way you probably think. n We generally assume that time is an emotionally neutral background to life: that the clock just ticks along, and our circumstances and personalities determine our satisfaction with life. (By happiness, I mean not cheerfulness or elation or any such positive mood, but the larger, more important concept of well-being u2014 feeling satisfied and fulfilled by our lives as a whole.) n The reality turns out to be quite different. Data from millions of people in countries and cultures around the world show that time is not neutral at all. It is more like a river current, with an independent effect on happiness all its own. n Hearing this, our next assumption may be that time works against happiness. After all, as we age, we have fewer years of life to look forward to, and more years of decline and disability. n Wrong again. When researchers factor out all the circumstantial vagaries of life u2014 everything from income and employment to marriage and education u2014 time’s independent effect on life satisfaction turns out to be U-shaped, with the nadir (in the U.S.) at roughly age 50. n In other words, time fights life satisfaction through midlife, but then it then turns around, helping us feel grateful and fulfilled right through old age. At the bottom of the curve, we often experience a multi-year funk. n When high-performing people hit the bottom of the U-shaped curve n The happiness curve is not unique to professionals. In fact, it is not even unique to humans; a version of it has been observed in chimps and orangutans. But successful professionals seem to be more likely to feel it. n Why? n High achievers are wired to be dissatisfied when we meet goals u2014 that is the evolutionary motivation to do the next big thing u2014 but the result is often cumulating disappointment. Year after year of finding success less fulfilling than we expected makes us pessimistic about ever attaining satisfaction. So we are simultaneously disappointed in the past and gloomy about the future. n Remember, the happiness curve is only one of factors shaping life satisfaction. People who face painful hardships may feel unhappy, but at least they will know why. By contrast, if you are a successful professional with everything to be grateful for, feeling disappointed in middle age will make no sense to you. Like Simon, you may blame yourself. n Or you may invent something to blame. When people feel dissatisfied, they naturally seek a reason. But human beings turn out to be quite poor at attributing our unhappiness, and we face a special challenge with midlife malaise, because although it is often an artifact of the aging process, it nevertheless feels as if it must be about something. n High-achieving professionals tend to make a heavy emotional investment in their careers. Faced with inexplicable discontent, they may do what Simon does (and what I did), namely fantasize about throwing away their job and starting life anew. n As if all of that were not enough, high-achieving professionals face social pressure to seem masterly and invulnerable, especially in their 40s and 50s, at or near the supposed peak of their career. If they are feeling restless, dissatisfied, or trapped, they often tell no one, not even their spouse. But isolation only makes the problem worse. n And so successful professionals get hit from three sides: Their success makes an age-driven midlife slump both conspicuous and baffling; they mistakenly blame the slump on their careers, and they hide their feelings. Each of those tendencies can reinforce the others. n Three steps to take to get past the bottom of your happiness U-curve n How to cope, if you or someone in your life is struggling in these coils? n First, reaching out to friends, mentors, and coaches does not come easy, especially to high achievers who worry about showing vulnerability, but it can really help. Isolation is not your friend. n Second, beware of disruptive change, because age-driven malaise simply accompanies us to the next place. Change may be warranted in midlife (as at any other time), but make it logical and incremental, building on proven strengths and accumulated connections. Step, don’t leap. n Third, be patient. Often, the best thing to do is the simplest. Wait it out. As we age past midlife, our expectations, our values, and even our brains readjust in ways that help us find new heights of contentment in our 50s, 60s, and beyond. n Finally, be reassured. If you have feelings like Simon’s, there is nothing wrong with you. You are passing through a natural, albeit unpleasant, transition. On the odds, you will be surprised by the rebirth of contentment that lies around the bend. n Jonathan Rauch, a senior fellow at the Brookings Institution, is the author of The Happiness Curve: Why Life Gets Better After 50 , published by St. Martin’s press. n n You might also enjoy… n n New neuroscience reveals 4 rituals that will make you happy n Strangers know your social class in the first seven words you say, study finds n 10 lessons from Benjamin Franklinu2019s daily schedule that will double your productivity n The worst mistakes you can make in an interview, according to 12 CEOs n 10 habits of mentally strong people n n”,”protected”:false},”excerpt”:{“rendered”:” High-achieving professionals seem especially vulnerable to missing out on happiness in midlife. This is how to get past it if middle age is leaving you unhappy despite your success. n”,”protected”:false},”author”:630,”featured_media”:41923,”comment_status”:”closed”,”ping_status”:”closed”,”sticky”:false,”template”:””,”format”:”standard”,”meta”:{“amp_status”:””},”categories”:[94,95],”tags”:[18268,18634,11657,86,25838,326,9493,88,2082],”yst_prominent_words”:[34550,17591,37958,17503,70103,4525,37953,37956,37959,37955,37957,17450,13285,5189,204,263,331,1065,37954,17443],”yoast”:{“focuskw”:”happiness”,”title”:”Happiness: Why successful people can’t find it in middle age | Ladders”,”metadesc”:”High-achieving professionals seem vulnerable to missing out on happiness. This is how to get past it if middle age is leaving you unhappy despite success.”,”linkdex”:”76″,”metakeywords”:””,”meta-robots-noindex”:””,”meta-robots-nofollow”:””,”meta-robots-adv”:””,”canonical”:””,”redirect”:””,”opengraph-title”:”This is why successful people are unhappy in middle age u2014 and what to do about it”,”opengraph-description”:”High-achieving professionals seem especially to vulnerable dissatisfaction in midlife.”,”opengraph-image”:”/wp-content/uploads/Unhappy_Middle_Age_050318.jpg”,”twitter-title”:””,”twitter-description”:””,”twitter-image”:””},”acf”:{“not_original_content”:false,”pinterest_image”:false,”related_tag”:{“term_id”:11657,”name”:”Happiness”,”slug”:”happiness”,”term_group”:0,”term_taxonomy_id”:11657,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”description”:””,”parent”:0,”count”:1413,”filter”:”raw”}},”yoast_meta”:{“title”:”Happiness: Why successful people can’t find it in middle age | Ladders”},”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78231″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts”}],”about”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/types/post”}],”author”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/users/630″}],”replies”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/comments?post=78231″}],”version-history”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78231/revisions”}],”wp:featuredmedia”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media/41923″}],”wp:attachment”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media?parent=78231″}],”wp:term”:[{“taxonomy”:”category”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/categories?post=78231″},{“taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/tags?post=78231″},{“taxonomy”:”yst_prominent_words”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/yst_prominent_words?post=78231″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}},{“id”:78316,”date”:”2019-05-26T04:10:25″,”date_gmt”:”2019-05-26T08:10:25″,”guid”:{“rendered”:”/?p=78316″},”modified”:”2019-05-26T08:04:40″,”modified_gmt”:”2019-05-26T12:04:40″,”slug”:”9-words-and-phrases-that-make-any-professional-look-weak”,”status”:”publish”,”type”:”post”,”link”:”/career-advice/9-words-and-phrases-that-make-any-professional-look-weak/”,”title”:{“rendered”:”9 words and phrases that make any professional look weak”},”content”:{“rendered”:” Hey, Iu2019m not sure if you have the time right now, but it would be great if you can read my latest column. Is that OK? n u2026said the weakest communicator ever. n Confidence is a powerful tool to gain respect and get stuff done. n n Follow Ladders on Flipboard ! n Follow Laddersu2019 magazines on Flipboard covering Happiness , Productivity , Job Satisfaction , Neuroscience , and more ! n n As you compose emails/documents (and in conversation too), remove these words/phrases from your vocabulary. They make you look weak. n 1. Just n u201cIu00a0 just u00a0want to ask you…u201d n u201cItu2019llu00a0 justu00a0 take a minute…u201d n u201cIu2019mu00a0 just u00a0saying… n Weak, weak, weak. u201cJustu201d is a little word with big implications. Each time we use u201cjust,u201d it suggests we waste someoneu2019s time. No, if you have something important to say, then say it. n Well, anywayu2026itu2019su00a0 justu00a0 a writing tip. n See how that sounds? Weak. n 2. Sorry n Donu2019t apologize all over the place. In most cases, you didnu2019t do anything wrong. u201cSorryu201d is more like u201cSorry for bothering youu201d or u201cSorry for taking up your time.u201d n Of course, if youu00a0 did u00a0screw up, then yeau2026say u201cSorry.u201d n But if you have worthwhile information to send in an email or say aloud, then go for it. Respect yourself and the value you add to the conversation. n 3. Iu2019m not sure if you can, but u2026 n Such an inferior tone. As if the other person is SO important and SO busy that you need to kneel down and beg for assistance. n How about u201cWould you like to…u201d? n Stay on equal footing with the person across from you. Youu2019re no worse (or better). Eye to eye is the way to play it. n 4. I hate to bother you, but u2026 n Similar to #3, u201cI hate to bother you, but…u201d connotes the other person has all the power in the relationship. Even if youu2019re an intern, new hire or several years junior to someone at the company, you have every right to stand proudly and say, u201cWhen you have a minute, Iu2019d like your opinion on…u201d n And let me tell you, plenty of business execs can u201csuddenlyu201d find 15 minutes in their jam-packed schedules if someone wants their opinion. Maybe even 30 minutes or an hour. n 5. I hope thatu2019s OK. n Donu2019t give up authority in the conversation u2014 you have the same rights to the territory. Instead, go with u201cThanks for the considerationu201d or u201cI appreciate the help.u201d n u2014 n Here are four u201cweaku201d writing habits specific to managers and other leaders in an organization. n 6. u201cThe new rule on vacation days has been put in place by me.u201d n Passive voice is perhaps the weakest way to communicate with your employees. You must be willing to stand by your decisions, and the best way is to put yourself (u201cIu201d) at the start of the sentence. n Correction:u00a0 u201cI have put in place a new rule on vacation days.u201d n 7. Put your call to action or request at the bottom of the message. n Timid managers wait until the last line of an email or document to explain what they need employees to do. Itu2019s a subtle way to say, u201cIu2019m afraid to give orders or be in charge.u201d n Instead, put the directive high up in the message. Employees will see the information right away, and your message will have a more assertive tone. n As an example: n u201cHi team, n Iu2019m writing to remind everyone to have their fourth-quarter reports on my desk by 5 p.m. on Friday. Remember the report must include…u201d n Start strong, and employees will take notice. n 8. More words = less respect n A boss who communicates with brevity commands a certain level of authority. That doesnu2019t mean you should write with a terseness that feels cold and emotionless. n The best leaders write with enthusiasmu00a0 and u00a0an economical word count. Itu2019s a skill that must be practiced every day by managers. n Whoops, there goes the passive voice again. n Managers must practice the skill every day. n 9. Misspelling an employeeu2019s first or last name n Want an easy way to lose an employeeu2019s respect? Spell his/her name wrong in an email/document. n Want to ruin the relationship for the long-term? Spell the name wrong more than once. n Before you press send, make sure the names are 100% correct. These are the people who put in the hours for you day after day. If you repeatedly type u201cJohnu201d instead of u201cJon,u201d itu2019s more than a u201cweaku201d approach. n Itu2019s a clear lack of respect. n u2014 n Well, Iu00a0 hope u00a0you like my advice. If not,u00a0 sorry u00a0for the trouble! n Your words set the tone. Use them wisely. n This column first appeared onu00a0 DannyhRubin.com. n n You might also enjoy… n n New neuroscience reveals 4 rituals that will make you happy n Strangers know your social class in the first seven words you say, study finds n 10 lessons from Benjamin Franklinu2019s daily schedule that will double your productivity n The worst mistakes you can make in an interview, according to 12 CEOs n 10 habits of mentally strong people n n”,”protected”:false},”excerpt”:{“rendered”:” Certain words can have a long-lasting impact. Don’t let these slip into your conversation. n”,”protected”:false},”author”:467,”featured_media”:35266,”comment_status”:”closed”,”ping_status”:”closed”,”sticky”:false,”template”:””,”format”:”standard”,”meta”:{“amp_status”:””},”categories”:[94,95],”tags”:[586,10729,9571],”yst_prominent_words”:[1260,172,70103,29305,337,544,29306,7650,29303,29307,18097,7339,17359,29304,17443,20009,24044,29300,473,17470],”yoast”:{“focuskw”:””,”title”:””,”metadesc”:””,”linkdex”:””,”metakeywords”:””,”meta-robots-noindex”:””,”meta-robots-nofollow”:””,”meta-robots-adv”:””,”canonical”:””,”redirect”:””,”opengraph-title”:”9 words and phrases that make you look weak”,”opengraph-description”:”Certain words can have a long-lasting impact. Don’t let these slip into your conversation.”,”opengraph-image”:”/wp-content/uploads/Weak_Words_030118.jpg”,”twitter-title”:””,”twitter-description”:””,”twitter-image”:””},”acf”:{“not_original_content”:false,”pinterest_image”:false,”related_tag”:{“term_id”:9571,”name”:”Words at Work”,”slug”:”words-at-work”,”term_group”:0,”term_taxonomy_id”:9571,”taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”description”:””,”parent”:0,”count”:160,”filter”:”raw”}},”yoast_meta”:{“title”:”9 words and phrases that make any professional look weak | Ladders”},”_links”:{“self”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78316″}],”collection”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts”}],”about”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/types/post”}],”author”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/users/467″}],”replies”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/comments?post=78316″}],”version-history”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/posts/78316/revisions”}],”wp:featuredmedia”:[{“embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media/35266″}],”wp:attachment”:[{“href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/media?parent=78316″}],”wp:term”:[{“taxonomy”:”category”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/categories?post=78316″},{“taxonomy”:”post_tag”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/tags?post=78316″},{“taxonomy”:”yst_prominent_words”,”embeddable”:true,”href”:”/wp-json/wp/v2/yst_prominent_words?post=78316″}],”curies”:[{“name”:”wp”,”href”:”https://api.w.org/{rel}”,”templated”:true}]}}], articleCategories: { officeLife: [{“link”:”/career-advice/heres-how-to-keep-your-quarter-life-crisis-from-breaking-you-down-2″,”title”:”Hereu0026#8217;s how to keep your quarter-life crisis from breaking you down”},{“link”:”/career-advice/employees-treasure-this-the-most-when-it-comes-to-job-satisfaction-2″,”title”:”Employees treasure this the most when it comes to job satisfaction”},{“link”:”/career-advice/9-words-and-phrases-that-make-any-professional-look-weak”,”title”:”9 words and phrases that make any professional look weak”},{“link”:”/career-advice/these-interview-questions-make-it-harder-for-certain-job-candidates-to-succeed”,”title”:”These interview questions make it harder for certain job candidates to succeed”},{“link”:”/career-advice/most-productive-people-6-things-they-do-every-day”,”title”:”Most productive people: 6 things they do every day”},{“link”:”/career-advice/how-can-you-make-your-weekends-more-awesome-2″,”title”:”How can you make your weekends more awesome?”},{“link”:”/career-advice/scrap-everything-you-know-about-creating-strong-passwords-and-do-this-instead”,”title”:”Scrap everything you know about creating strong passwords and do this instead”},{“link”:”/career-advice/the-5-personality-traits-successful-people-share”,”title”:”The 5 personality traits successful people share”}], futureOfWork: [{“link”:”/career-advice/looking-for-a-long-term-career-heres-why-clean-energys-a-good-place-to-start”,”title”:”Looking for a long-term career? 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[{“link”:”/career-advice/student-loan-debt-has-huge-mental-health-aspects”,”title”:”Student loan debt has huge mental health aspects”},{“link”:”/career-advice/if-you-live-in-this-city-youre-actually-living-your-best-life”,”title”:”If you live in this city, youu0026#8217;re actually living your best life”},{“link”:”/career-advice/this-is-how-burning-man-teaches-millionaires-how-to-be-successful”,”title”:”This is how Burning Man teaches millionaires how to be successful”},{“link”:”/career-advice/women-more-productive-at-higher-temperatures”,”title”:”Game changing study reveals that turning up the thermostat may increase womenu0026#8217;s productivity”},{“link”:”/career-advice/scrap-everything-you-know-about-creating-strong-passwords-and-do-this-instead”,”title”:”Scrap everything you know about creating strong passwords and do this instead”},{“link”:”/career-advice/how-can-you-make-your-weekends-more-awesome-2″,”title”:”How can you make your weekends more 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